Back to blogging

by Steve

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When I first started this blog in 2004 – back then it was called Lornitropia – I started it for one reason. I wanted to improve my writing, and practice was the key. At the time my job didn’t involve that much writing and it seemed like a good idea.

So I started blogging. Then, like many I suppose, I made a transition without really intending to. I transitioned, at least in my own mind, from blogger to…well…something else. Not really a journalist, but something more than just a guy writing stuff. My standards went up and the amount of content went down.

I didn’t write many things because I felt like they weren’t good enough or right for the blog. This is a really stupid way of blogging, so I’m going to stop doing that.

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As I’ve been updating my Linkedin profile, I’ve been thinking about how to best use the skills section. In the new skills people can endorse you for having skills. Here’s some mistakes I’d made, and my thoughts on how best to manage the skills area going forward.

  1. Listing every skill I had, instead of those that really define the value I bring.At first I listed every skill I had – why not? It’s all about SEO and search terms, right? The problem is that the result looked like a dog’s breakfast. It was distracting and didn’t paint a clear picture of the value I offer. I cut out the skills that weren’t core to who I am, and left those that were most relevant.
  2. Listing the skills based on experience instead of value.I’ve always had great computer skills, and listing those was easy and comfortable. They don’t, however, represent the higher value I can bring. So I’ve removed them and added the higher value skills I offer – like analysis, management, etc.
  3. Leaving in the skills others entered for me.One of the annoying features of Linkedin’s skills area is that a visitor can endorse you for a new skill that you haven’t decided to list. This can result in erroneous and off-brand skills being listed. While having someone else give an endorsement is always nice, the result when many do it can bring back the disorganization and dilute the message. Of course, if everyone is endorsing me for a skill I haven’t listed, I should reconsider.

LinkedIn continues to change and evolve, and each time it changes how the site is used and what techniques make it most effective.

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LinkedIn Profile Review by Jason Alba: Best Money Spent in a Long Time

February 5, 2013
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I took Jason up on his recent offer of a webinar on the new LinkedIn profiles, along with a profile critique, and it’s been the best money I’ve spent in a long time. A lot of really smart people have written many times that one should not hesitate to get help when it’s necessary, and […]

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Looking for a piano teacher in the Milwaukee area?

January 8, 2013
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Last June my oldest daughter finally brought her requests for piano lessons to a crescendo, and I relented and started looking for a teacher. Finding the right combination of price, location, and availability was a bit tricky. I didn’t really want to driver her out to one of the larger music stores for lessons (that […]

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